VELONDONISTA’S GUIDE TO BIKES

If you have no idea which bike your should ride then you are in the right place. This basic guide will stop you from looking all confused and unsure when you next go to the bike shop. Below is a beginners guide to bikes suitable to your cycling environment and biking style.

 


ROAD BIKE

Road bike tends to be those bikes especially built for the roads and travelling at a faster speed with the horn like front handlebars.

Pros: They are fast. They are light. It covers long straight road way quicker than any other bike.

Cons: They can be too fast. The riding position is not that good on your back for daily commute. You mostly need specialist clothing to ride one. Vulnerable to damage from kerbs and potholes. No carrying capacity.

Would suit: Speed junkie. Lycra lover. Competitive personality. Someone who doesn’t park on the streets much as these are thief magnets.

Cost: from £450 going into ‘000s

Brands: Verenti, Shimano, Sram, Campagnolo and many others


FIXED GEAR BIKE

A ‘fixie’ as most owners of one refer to it. You know that pretty bike that hasn’t got any gears. The frame looks cool and simple.

Pros: It looks good. It is fast. It is light. Not much to go wrong with it as minimal amount of components.

Cons: If you are female, you can never wear a skirt whilst riding a fixie. There is only one speed. Similarly to Road Bike vulnerable to damage from kerbs and potholes.

Would suit: Quite an experienced cyclist. Someone who wants to look cool cycling. Anyone with attitude.

Cost: Second hand vary from £100 upwards. In general cheaper as they don’t have gears.

Brands: Mango (cheap and does customised colours), Fixation, Hoffa and lots of others

 

 


URBAN BIKE

There isn’t a clear definition to one but recently there had been more and more of these popping up. It is an easy to ride bike that looks good and also is equipped for riding in the cities.

Pros: They have gears. They look good. They tend to be light and fast.

Cons: Might not be as fast as other bikes

Would suit: Commuter. Easy rider.

Brands: Bobbin, TempleTokyobike and Kennedy

Cost: from £370

 

 

 


DUTCH & CRUISER BIKES

I put these two different bike types into the same category as typically these are the bikes with a straight seating position.

Pros: You can wear what your want riding one. Good for your back. Practical as you can carry plenty of things with you. durable – they last many years.

Cons: Slow and heavy. They tend to have limited gears.

Would suit: Safe cyclist that is not worried about time or speed. Someone who has back pains. Someone who needs to carry things on their bike.

Brands: Batavus and Hollandia are Dutch bikes and  Schwinn and Electra are cruiser bikes. Also several other brands like Pashley and Bobbin do their own versions of dutch bikes.

 

 

 


FOLDING BIKE

Name speaks for itself, these handy bikes are foldable.

Pros: They can be quite fast. Convenient. Easy to store and carry (obviously).

Cons: Not the best for long route commute perhaps. Can get pricey and not so pleasing on the eye.

Brands: Brompton, Birdy

 

 

 

 

 


HYBRID BIKE

Hybrid bikes tend to have wider tires and is suitable for city and country roads. Often hybrid is just a feature of the bike, it just means it is more adaptable to the urban cycling.

Brands: Pashley Penny and many others

 

 

 

 

 

 


MIXTE BIKE

This is a unisex version of a road bike but more adaptable to a city living. It has a very distinctive frame that consists of two forks. There had definitely been a raise in demand for these bikes as they have a very beautiful frame. These also tend to be vintage bikes, and often come from somewhere in France or Belgium.These have lower standover height of a step-through frame bicycle with a strong diamond-frame geometry. Mixte (pronounced [mikst]) is a direct appropriation of the French word meaning “mixed” or “unisex”. Please note the Pashley Penny above is actually also a Mixte bike.

Brands: Peugeut (vintage)

 

 

 

 


 

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2 Comments

  1. 31/10/2016 / 17:12

    Love this! I used to own a mixte bike in college but since moving Uptown, I now ride a hybdrid. I still miss my mixte and I am considering of buying a new one (one can never have too many bikes, right?).

    Your blog is so unique and lovely! You have gained one more reader 😀

    • velondonista
      31/10/2016 / 17:27

      I also used to have a mixte, which I quite miss now. I keep looking at the old school Peugeot mixte frames… So totally understand how you feel! Thank you glad you enjoy it b
      JB // xx

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